Smart Farmers

Last week I held a presentation on urban evolution and the digitalization of our cities at the Swedish TechDays it was a conversation on the drivers behind the smartness or our cities. On how internet of things was enabling this.

image

If internet of things can digitalize our famers. Our cities can’t be far behind. The above image is from my technology vision talk, I shared this in the smart cities talk because I believe that what is happening here is important. We are not seeing robotic cows, but we are seeing the blur of the physical and digital worlds.

When a farmer painlessly can put a chip into cow and let it transmit data. Correlate that with data on milk quality, weather, food and all other data possible to capture. The farmer will embark on a journey that makes his business digital.

image

Similarly to what I discussed in my post about smart vending machines the farmer can draw insights and get a better understanding of his business. He can use these insights to optimize his farm and ensure the best quality of milk.

But this digitalization opens up for other business models as well. What if this farmer sold his insights to other farms? He could be rewarded for the effective way he runs his farm in more then one way. He could create new revenue streams. For a non-digitalized farmer this would be unthinkable.

For a digitalized farmer, this is just the art of the possible realized.

MicroControllers are fun

I am preparing for my participation in TeliaSonera M2M symposium and the Swedish TechDays. Since my focus is internet of things I am playing around with the Arduino and Microsoft Intelligent System Service. This took me way back to school and the old Motorola 6X000 controllers. Back then everything had to be burned onto a PROM. Today it is more or less a computer.

This post will serve as guide for anyone that want to replicate some of the stuff I am showing at the mentioned events. It wont dive into the details on the electronics nor will it discuss the underlying architecture and design.

The Ardunio is quite simple to get running. All you need is the Arduino Sketch Editor or the Visual Studio Plugin: Visual Micro. A little bit of C++ knowledge and a lot of cool electronics and you can get going. For me it was about getting three things running:

  • Temperature readings
  • Motor control
  • Bar code scanning (this i ended up faking)

The temperature reading took a while to get running. But there are a huge amount of libraries that you can reuse. For temperature I used the OneWire and DallasTemperature and after a few calculations on resistors I got it to run and reading the sensor data is easy:

image

For this scenario all the data was relayed through the surface serving as the vendor machine screen. To do this I added the CmdMessenger library which made it easy to send events back and forth. Basically you add handlers and send evens through a bus that manages all the communication required:

image

The C# Code uses a similar pattern:

image

A very simple and straight forward model that will make it easy to send events from Arduino to C# and back. In the end the board was up and running and the vendor machine UI successfully sent and received events all the way back to Azure.

WP_20141116_14_13_03_Pro

And as stated in the title. MicroControllers are fun. I just got accepted into the Windows For Devices preview and will replicate this on the Galileo board. When I do, I will write a series of posts with all the required details to build your own smart vending machine.

Digital Innovation and the Bear Experience

325a6f4b-91fd-4bc4-94fa-0c06a9ac3dee

Everyone is talking about innovation and digital. The words are getting washed up completely and it’s fair to ask if this is a hype that will pass. I’d argue that it won’t. I’d argue that this is the new norm and it will be commoditized just like having a “home page” or an “app” have.

The driver behind this is our expectation of experiences. We do not want to exchange money for things anymore, we expect that for what we pay, companies should give us an experience.

Build a Bear

Build a bear is a prime example where a simple product becomes an experience. They have turned the cuddly bear from a toy you buy and play with to a toy and a service.

As a customer you start by going to their store and build your bear. You go through the experience of selecting body, head and accessories. You pay more for fancy stuff of course.

Image from careers.buildabear.com

What is unique is that the bear then get’s a virtual persona where you can play with your bear online, send it to the north pole and you will receive post cards from it’s trip.

Build a bear has been innovative around the cuddly bear. They’ve turned a toy product into a service they can charge a premium for.

Moving from products and services to experiences.

We expect experiences with what we buy. No matter if it is a product or a service. This can range from your café experience to buying a car.

A business that wants to stay relevant and not get into a price war needs to start building these experiences for their customers. They need to shift from product innovation to service innovation.

Build a bear does this beautifully. They are not throwing themselves into a price war where the only increase in margin can come from lowering their cost of manufacturing. They create experiences that are unique. Experiences they can charge a premium for. By adding more services to the experience they make it hard for a competitor to copy their service chain without a huge investment up front.

At Avanade we see this shift in most of our consumer goods clients. They are all trying to figure out how add to the experience and turn their products into services. In our services clients we see a push to chaining services together to make their unique experience hard to copy. Banks are investing heavily in this now. Moving deeper into your household economy with apps and online services.

This is only logical. We as consumers, or buyers, are lazy. We want our experiences to be easy. If my travel agency takes care of everything for me, I’ll pay for that service. If my coffee machine maker calls me when I need to cleanse my machine, I’ll pay a premium for the machine. If my phone gives me all the services I need. I’ll never switch.

Same old, same old?

We have of course always loved it when the customer service is great. We gladly tip our waiter if we had good service. In that sense, turning products into services and chaining them together is nothing new. What is new is that companies that aren’t pure service companies are investing into this. They are switching from gaining value in the exchange of goods to gaining value in creating experiences.

There is an opportunity for you here.

One of the most important enablers of this is technology. As developers, architects and technology leaders we play a huge role in creating these services. Build a bear wouldn’t be successful without the technology component, nor would the banks.

The shift from product dominance to service dominance is a huge opportunity for us as technologists to truly disrupt and create unique values. Most businesses do not understand technology as well as you and have a hard time to turn technical advancements into innovation for their market.

There is a huge amount of cool work to be done. Go fetch.

Read more:
Service Dominant Logic (wikipedia)
Service Innovation – A Service – Dominant Logic Perspective (research paper)
Competing in a service economy (eBook)
From Software as product to Software as a Service (blog post)